frozenheadcanons

hafanforever:

From Coloring Book to Final Film: Hans’s Downfall

In this analysis, I had discussed a scene that appeared in the novelization and jumbo coloring book, but was deleted from the theatrical version of Frozen, where Hans does not get knocked out by the impact of his sword hitting against Anna’s frozen body. He tries to attack Elsa as she mourns for Anna, but Kristoff manages to step in in time and hit Hans, which then puts him into an unconscious state.

I had previously explained that the moment of Kristoff stopping Hans was removed because it took away the dramatic moment of Elsa mourning for Anna, which was considered far more important. That makes a lot of sense to me, since the heart of the film is their relationship, and now Elsa is in deep grief over losing the person she loves most in the world. Not to mention that when Elsa starts crying over Anna, everything around her falls silent, so it seems that it would be wrong to interrupt that, especially with a brief moment of fighting action.

And since I first made the original post, I have done some further thinking and can make sense of another reason on why it is better that Hans was knocked out by hitting Anna’s body rather than it not happening and having Kristoff intervene and fight Hans.

Remember that Anna saving Elsa was an act of true love. And it wasn’t just an act that saved her own life, but Elsa as well. The way I see it, Hans getting knocked out after hitting Anna’s frozen body showed that she symbolically defeated him because of the love she has for her sister. Once he was out cold, the danger was over and Elsa was safe.

So if Hans didn’t get knocked out like it was originally planned, that seems to imply that Anna’s act only partially worked. When Elsa begins to mourn for Anna, she is not completely safe from Hans. And this meant that help was needed, which is why Kristoff interferes and knocks down Hans once and for all.

Make any sense?

And on a minor note, the fact that Kristoff was originally was supposed to knock Hans down suggests that this film was another fairy tale in which a man faced off the villain and saved the princess (or queen, in this case). But by removing it from the final film, it shows that Elsa and Anna didn’t need a man at all to stop the villain from killing them.

So I have here the two coloring book pages that show the original scene in contrast with two gifs from the same moment in the final film. Given all that I have said, which version of this scene makes more sense to you? ;)

martinfreeman
soyboy666

clitreaper:

clitreaper:

Hello everyone. These are pictures of a girl from my school named Cara Golias. She recently went missing on Sunday of September 28th and we all are very worried about where she might be. She lives in the northern Virginia area near Washington, D.C. in a county named Fairfax. So if you are from that area please take a moment to read this. She is 16 years old, has hazel eyes, brown hair, and is about 115 pounds. Please share this so we can help her achieve a swift and safe return. Even if you aren’t from this area, sharing this may help notify someone who does, everything counts.

Please read and reblog this so my friend can come home.

artbymoga

dickmark:

OKAY SO ALMOST 2 MONTHS AGO OUR ENGLISH TEACHER FORCED US TO ENTER A POETRY CONTEST AND I WAS ABOUT TO ENTER A POEM WHEN IT TRIED TO FORCE ME TO GIVE IT A TITLE SO IN A FIT OF RAGE I WROTE A NEW POEM COMPLAINING ABOUT THE TITLE REQUIREMENT

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AND TODAY I WENT TO CHECK MY EMAIL AND I??????

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YOU ARE LITERALLY PUBLISHING AN INSULT TO YOUR OWN RULES BUT OKAY I GUESS IF GETTING TALKED DOWN TO TURNS YOU ON SOMEHOW AND I GET PUBLISHED I’VE GOT NO COMPLAINTS HERE?

frozenheadcanons

hafanforever:

Chess Pieces: The Princess Pawn and the Fallen Queen

Have you noticed that in the scene when Hans and Anna are alone, then when Olaf saves her, there is a chess set in the background?

When Hans reveals his true colors, he explains his scheme to take control of Arendelle. He only pretended to love Anna and hoped to marry her in order to make sure he could become king. This exploits her as the pawn he used and manipulated in order to carry out his plan. When he extinguishes the candle, you can see a couple of white pawn chess pieces.

Then later, when Olaf is with Anna, the blizzard makes a strong gust of wind burst the window open. When that happens, the white queen chess piece falls down. This symbolizes the upcoming figurative and literal “fall” of Elsa, when Hans lies to her about Anna, then attempts to murder her.

Interestingly enough, the colors of the chess pieces are commonly used to represent good (white) and evil (black). Elsa is a good person, which is why the white queen piece falls, and you can see the black king piece, which symbolizes Hans’s evil nature and goal to become the king of Arendelle.